Loading...

This site uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some cookies on this site are essential, and the site won't work as expected without them. Read More

Box Surgery

Childhood Vaccinations


One of the most important things that a parent can do for their child is to make sure that they have all their routine childhood vaccinations. It's the most effective way of keeping them protected against infectious diseases.

 

Ideally, kids should have their jabs at the right age to protect them as early as possible and minimise the risk of infection.


Vaccination Checklist

 

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

 

 

If you're not sure whether you or your child have had all your routine vaccinations, ask your GP or practice nurse to find out for you. It may be possible to 'catch up' later in life.

2 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine – this single jab contains vaccines to protect against five separate diseases: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children)  

 

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine - The pneumococcal vaccine (or 'pneumo jab' as it's also known) protects you against pneumococcal infections.

 

Rotavirus vaccine - An oral vaccine against rotavirus infection, a common cause of diarrhoea and sickness, is given as two doses for babies aged 2 months and 3 months alongside their other childhood immunisations.

3 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, second dose

 

Meningitis C - The meningitis C vaccine - better known as Men C - protects against infection by meningococcal group C bacteria, which can cause two very serious illnesses,  meningitis and septicaemia.

 

Rotavirus vaccine, second dose

4 months

5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, third dose

 

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, second dose

Between 12 and 13 months

Hib/Men C booster, given as a single jab containing meningitis C (second dose) and Hib (fourth dose)

 

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, given as a single jab - MMR is a safe and effective combined vaccine that protects against three separate illnesses - measles, mumps and rubella (German measles) - in a single injection. The full course of MMR vaccination requires two doses.

 

Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, third dose

2 and 3 years

Flu vaccine (annual) -  An annual nasal spray flu vaccine is available for all children aged two and three years as part of the NHS childhood vaccination programme.

3 years and 4 months, or soon after

Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, second dose

 

4-in-1 (DTaP/IPV) pre-school booster, given as a single jab containing vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis) and polio.

Around 12-13 years

HPV vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only)  three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years

3-in-1 (Td/IPV) teenage booster, given as a single jab which contains vaccines against diphtheria, tetanus and polio

Around 13-15 years

Meningitis C booster

Choose font size: A A A

GP Website from Wiggly-Amps Ltd. | Total visitors:211997 | Disclaimer